Tis the Season: The Pleasures and Pitfalls of Gift-Giving

Part I: It may be the thought that counts, but often its the gift that gets sparks flying between the sexes. Virginia Commonwealth University marketing professor Pam Kiecker and Mary Washington College English …

December 6, 1996

Searching for the Promised Land: History of Jews in Virginia

Jews were among the earliest settlers in Virginia, and they have played a pivotal role in Virginia history. Oddly, their history is seldom told. In this Hanukkah special, Myron Berman, author of Richmond’s …

November 29, 1996

The First Thanksgiving and Virginia’s Native American Tribes

William and Mary historian James Axtell joins Old Dominion University anthropologist Helen Rountree for a lively look at early colonist-Indian relations in the towns of Plymouth, Mass., and Jamestown, Va. Find the segment audio …

November 23, 1996

So Sue Me: The Demise of Common-Sense Law

Clogged court dockets and multi-million dollar settlements are just two troubling signs of our litigious society. George Mason University law professor David Bertsein says we need more-focused laws that specifically spell out …

November 16, 1996

Humbling Empires: U.S. Efforts to Defeat the Axis Powers

Part I: Old Dominion University historian Carl Boyd, author of Hitler’s Japanese Confident, discusses how the U.S. cracked the Japanese diplomatic code and intercepted critical communications about Nazi activities and attitudes sent from Berlin to …

November 9, 1996

Political Literacy: What Americans Should Know Before Voting

On Tuesday this week, millions of Americans will cast their votes to elect our nations’ leader. Yet many Americans know little about politics, and the blurring of lines between party …

November 2, 1996

Dark Passages: The Role of Evil in Literature

From ancient Greek epics to the latest best seller, depictions of evil have remained a staple of human literacy output. Why are we fascinated by what we fear? English professors Roy …

October 25, 1996

Mineral Fights: The Role of Geology in Civil War Battles

Virginia was the most populous Southern state and the most agriculturally and industrially developed. But it wasn’t Virginia’s cities, farms or factories that set the stage for some of the …

October 12, 1996

Seeing Green: The Economics of Environmentalism

For more than 30 years, environmentalists have stressed the long-term benefits of environmentally friendly business practices, but has big business finally gotten the message? Some economists are even trying to …

September 21, 1996

Heal Thyself: Over-The-Counter Drugs and Alternative Medicines

Part I: With the explosion of over-the-counter drugs, consumers can treat dozens of illnesses that once required trips to the doctor. Dr. Graham Patrick, professor of pharmacology at Virginia Commonwealth University’s Medical …

September 14, 1996

E Pluribus Unum? Divisiveness and Defining America

Melting pot or seething cauldron? Americans strive to forge a national identity while clinging to their own ethnic, racial, social, political, historical, or sexual identities. University of Virginia historian James Davison …

September 7, 1996

The Shadow of a Doubt: Minorities and the Courts

The percentage of black inmates on death row is 10 times higher than that of whites. Penalties for possession or distribution of crack are much more severe than those for …

August 25, 1996

Innocence Lost: The Politics of Child Abuse

Is child abuse in America on an alarming increase or merely better reported? Who stands to gain—or lose—in the debate? James Madison University psychologist Anne Stewart joins Virginia Commonwealth University sociologist David Stoesz, author …

August 11, 1996

Home Improvement: Building Family Communication Skills

Kids say the darndest things. Sometimes so do their parents. Longwood psychologist David Stein specializes in family therapy, especially controlling difficult teens. He is joined by Mary Washington psychologist Thomas Moeller for a frank …

July 21, 1996

Featured

A black and white photo in which one light-skinned US Marine in uniform leans against the Vietnam memorial wall.

Voices of Vietnam

The Vietnam War pulled America apart, dividing our country into factions. And yet, memories of the Vietnam War unite us. In a new eight-part special series, With Good Reason explores the unresolved tensions in our understanding of the war and the perspectives and people it forever changed.