New Advances in Medical Research

Part I: University of Virginia oncologist Dr. Leland Chung is working with a team of scientists, who may be just two years away from testing on humans a vaccine for prostate cancer. Chung …

March 21, 1997

Bound for Glory: New Books and Poetry by Virginia Writers

Part I: Novelist George Garrett of University of Virginia and poet Lucinda Roy of Virginia Tech discuss their latest works, the role of poetry in modern life and ways to encourage its appreciation among young …

March 7, 1997

Changing Places: Coal Towns and Appalachian Oral Tradition

Chronic underemployment and mass media threaten to erase unique cultures and traditions in mining towns throughout Appalachia. Scholars are racing to document the lives and lore of these communities before …

February 28, 1997

Drawing the Line: The Legacy of Warren Burger

Chief Justice Warren Burger presided over the Supreme Court from 1969-86, issuing/landmark decisions on abortion, pornography, and Constitutional questions related to Watergate. Law professor John Jeffries, who clerked in the Burger …

February 21, 1997

Stories Seldom Told: A Celebration of Black History Month

Negro History Week was changed to Black History Month in 1976. Why do we have it? And how does it help us to understand the contributions of African-Americans. Historians Edgar Toppin of …

February 14, 1997

Tragic Endings: Suicide and the Elderly

The rate of suicide among the elderly is 50 percent higher than that of the general population. And it continues to climb. For some people, suicide is becoming a ritualized …

February 7, 1997

Blacks, the Law, and Lynching

Virginia was one of the first states to be readmitted to the Union after the Civil War, perhaps because its post-war constitution promised equal treatment under the law to former …

January 31, 1997

Both Sides Now: Multiculturalism in the Classroom

Many people feel multiculturalism is a plot by liberal professors to undermine the accomplishments of dead, white, European males. Not true, says George Mason historian Lawrence Levine, author of The Opening of …

January 24, 1997

You Must Remember This: Advertising and Memory

Advertisers will spend millions of dollars on this year’s Super Bowl to get us want to wear their jeans, drink their sodas, and drive their cars. When we’re happy, their …

January 17, 1997

As a Matter of Fat: American’s Obession with Weight

Part I: For the first time in history, overweight Americans outnumber “normal-sized” ones. University of Virginia exercise physiologist Glenn Gaesser, author of Big Fat Lies, says dieting almost always promotes the very thing …

January 10, 1997

Put to the Test: The Controversy over Standards of Learning

Racial and ethnic divisiveness made the creation of statewide standards for history in Virginia a lengthy and controversial process. Now some educators are calling for national standards. Are we up …

January 3, 1997

It’s a Small World: The Threat of Unchecked Population Growth

The world’s population is expected to double between 1990 and 2050, the shortest doubling rate in man’s history. The pressures on food and water supplies will be unprecedented. George Mason …

December 27, 1996

The Sky’s the Limit: The Role of the Heavens Across Cultures

From astrology to Zen, the heavens have been revered in every culture under the sun. Have Martian bacteria and multiple moon walks demystified the skies for modern man? University of …

December 20, 1996

Holy City, Holy Wars: Jerusalem and the Rise of Fundamentalism

Jerusalem is a city of unmatched importance to Christians, Muslims, and Jews alike. Throughout history, the City of David has triggered fierce reverence and fanatic revenge. Virginia Tech historian William Ochsenwald and …

December 13, 1996

Featured

A black and white photo in which one light-skinned US Marine in uniform leans against the Vietnam memorial wall.

Voices of Vietnam

The Vietnam War pulled America apart, dividing our country into factions. And yet, memories of the Vietnam War unite us. In a new eight-part special series, With Good Reason explores the unresolved tensions in our understanding of the war and the perspectives and people it forever changed.