Blacks, the Law, and Lynching

Virginia was one of the first states to be readmitted to the Union after the Civil War, perhaps because its post-war constitution promised equal treatment under the law to former …

January 31, 1997

Both Sides Now: Multiculturalism in the Classroom

Many people feel multiculturalism is a plot by liberal professors to undermine the accomplishments of dead, white, European males. Not true, says George Mason historian Lawrence Levine, author of The Opening of …

January 24, 1997

You Must Remember This: Advertising and Memory

Advertisers will spend millions of dollars on this year’s Super Bowl to get us want to wear their jeans, drink their sodas, and drive their cars. When we’re happy, their …

January 17, 1997

As a Matter of Fat: American’s Obession with Weight

Part I: For the first time in history, overweight Americans outnumber “normal-sized” ones. University of Virginia exercise physiologist Glenn Gaesser, author of Big Fat Lies, says dieting almost always promotes the very thing …

January 10, 1997

Put to the Test: The Controversy over Standards of Learning

Racial and ethnic divisiveness made the creation of statewide standards for history in Virginia a lengthy and controversial process. Now some educators are calling for national standards. Are we up …

January 3, 1997

It’s a Small World: The Threat of Unchecked Population Growth

The world’s population is expected to double between 1990 and 2050, the shortest doubling rate in man’s history. The pressures on food and water supplies will be unprecedented. George Mason …

December 27, 1996

The Sky’s the Limit: The Role of the Heavens Across Cultures

From astrology to Zen, the heavens have been revered in every culture under the sun. Have Martian bacteria and multiple moon walks demystified the skies for modern man? University of …

December 20, 1996

Holy City, Holy Wars: Jerusalem and the Rise of Fundamentalism

Jerusalem is a city of unmatched importance to Christians, Muslims, and Jews alike. Throughout history, the City of David has triggered fierce reverence and fanatic revenge. Virginia Tech historian William Ochsenwald and …

December 13, 1996

Tis the Season: The Pleasures and Pitfalls of Gift-Giving

Part I: It may be the thought that counts, but often its the gift that gets sparks flying between the sexes. Virginia Commonwealth University marketing professor Pam Kiecker and Mary Washington College English …

December 6, 1996

Searching for the Promised Land: History of Jews in Virginia

Jews were among the earliest settlers in Virginia, and they have played a pivotal role in Virginia history. Oddly, their history is seldom told. In this Hanukkah special, Myron Berman, author of Richmond’s …

November 29, 1996

The First Thanksgiving and Virginia’s Native American Tribes

William and Mary historian James Axtell joins Old Dominion University anthropologist Helen Rountree for a lively look at early colonist-Indian relations in the towns of Plymouth, Mass., and Jamestown, Va. Find the segment audio …

November 23, 1996

So Sue Me: The Demise of Common-Sense Law

Clogged court dockets and multi-million dollar settlements are just two troubling signs of our litigious society. George Mason University law professor David Bertsein says we need more-focused laws that specifically spell out …

November 16, 1996

Humbling Empires: U.S. Efforts to Defeat the Axis Powers

Part I: Old Dominion University historian Carl Boyd, author of Hitler’s Japanese Confident, discusses how the U.S. cracked the Japanese diplomatic code and intercepted critical communications about Nazi activities and attitudes sent from Berlin to …

November 9, 1996

Political Literacy: What Americans Should Know Before Voting

On Tuesday this week, millions of Americans will cast their votes to elect our nations’ leader. Yet many Americans know little about politics, and the blurring of lines between party …

November 2, 1996

Featured

A black and white photo in which one light-skinned US Marine in uniform leans against the Vietnam memorial wall.

Voices of Vietnam

The Vietnam War pulled America apart, dividing our country into factions. And yet, memories of the Vietnam War unite us. In a new eight-part special series, With Good Reason explores the unresolved tensions in our understanding of the war and the perspectives and people it forever changed.