Intoxicating Danger: Pfiesteria and Air Pollution

Part I: Fish kills from last summer’s outbreak of Pfiesteria panic for residents and watermen. Biologists Stephen Smith (Virginia Tech), Harold Marshall (Old Dominion University), and Larry Haas (Virginia Institute of Marine Science) unravel the complicated story of this …

July 24, 1998

Turning Points: The Election of Abraham Lincoln and First Manassas

Part I: The North calls it “Bull Run;” the South, “First Manassas.” But both agree that on July 21, 1861, the Confederacy was victorious – dashing any hope for a short …

July 17, 1998

Women’s Work: The 150th Anniversary of the Seneca Falls Convention

When housewife Elizabeth Cady Stanton and four friends sat down to afternoon tea on July 13, 1848, they had no idea their impromptu discussion would sow the seeds of an …

July 10, 1998

Made to Order: The Rise of General Washington

On July 4, 1776, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson were busy championing the Declaration, leaving George Washington in the field to fight a war with an undefined objective. What drove …

July 3, 1998

Tales of the Underground: Exploring Virginia Caves

Virginia and West Virginia have the second largest network of caves in the nation. John Holsinger (Old Dominion University) takes reporter Julieanne Welby on a tour of two underground vistas. And Karen Kastning (New …

June 26, 1998

Greek to Me: Teaching Foreign Language to Children

Foreign language is for kids. At least that’s what research shows. Children under age 10 learn languages better than adults who will always mentally translate into English. Susan St. Onge (Christopher Newport …

June 19, 1998

Democratic Drift and the End of History: A Discussion with Francis Fukuyama

In his award-winning 1992 essay, The End of History, Francis Fukuyama says liberal democracy is the only political system that the world views as legitimate. As a result, he contends, nations of the …

June 12, 1998

Making the Most of it: A Look at Time

Does time really fly as you get older? The answer is yes, according to psychologist Peter Mangan from Clinch Valley College. He is joined by Karl Pribram, “The Magellan of the Brain,” one …

June 5, 1998

Down Time: The Origins and Future of Leisure

Leisure is a twentieth century phenomenon, according to historian Cindy Aron (University of Virginia), but few of us understand how to enjoy our free time. And, surprisingly, many people don’t realize they’ve …

May 29, 1998

A Sinking Feeling: Going Down with the Ship and Other Maritime Lore

Part I: How many captains voluntarily go with their ships to the depths of Davey Jones’ locker? Historian Joe Goldenberg (Virginia State University) sets a true course on this nautical issue. Find the …

May 22, 1998

Shaky Foundations: The State of Virginia’s Bridges and Dams

Like many states, Virginia continues to face an extraordinary challenge in replacing old bridges that can no longer handle high traffic volume. But the Old Dominion is thrifty, selling most …

May 15, 1998

Beyond Colonialism: The Future of Sub-Saharan Africa

Adrift in a time-warp defined by colonial rule and the tyranny of corrupt governments, the nations of sub-Saharan Africa struggle to preserve their natural resources, develop their economies and save …

May 8, 1998

What are the Chances? Changing the Odds of Pregnancy and Conception

Part I: John Herr (University of Virginia) discusses his patent of a “home sperm test” that will allow men to assay their sperm count outside the doctor’s office. Find the segment audio …

May 1, 1998

Replay: Spreading the Wealth: Regional Tax Revenue Sharing

To stave off annexation battles and to improve metropolitan regions as a whole, many Virginia counties are now sharing tax revenues with neighboring cities. Norfolk State University sociologist Ronald Proctor and Virginia …

April 21, 1998

Featured

A black and white photo in which one light-skinned US Marine in uniform leans against the Vietnam memorial wall.

Voices of Vietnam

The Vietnam War pulled America apart, dividing our country into factions. And yet, memories of the Vietnam War unite us. In a new eight-part special series, With Good Reason explores the unresolved tensions in our understanding of the war and the perspectives and people it forever changed.