In 1970, Philicia Jefferson (Pentecostal Theological Seminary) was forced to integrate into all-white, E.C. Glass High School in Lynchburg, Virginia. 40 years later, she finally attended her first class reunion. She says it was a profoundly healing experience. Plus: As a teenager, Owen Cardwell (University of Lynchburg) made history as one of the first Black students to attend E.C. Glass High School. Today, he continues to work on improving equity in public schools as a civil rights leader and scholar.


Later in the show: In 1951, Barbara Johns led a student strike for equal education at Robert Russa Moton Highschool. Brian Daugherity (Virginia Commonwealth University) explains how this small community in Prince Edward County came to be at the center of the national fight to end segregated schools. And: Dwana Waugh (Sweet Briar College) has listened to countless oral histories from students who lived through desegregation. She says what struck her the most was the painful sense of loss African American students felt when leaving their all-black schools.

Skip to show segment

We Danced

Philicia Jefferson (Pentecostal Theological Seminary)

In 1970, Philicia Jefferson was forced to integrate into all-white, E.C. Glass High School in Lynchburg, Virginia. 40 years later, she finally attended her first class reunion. She says it was a profoundly healing experience.

14 mins

Fighting For Equal Education

Owen Cardwell (University of Lynchburg)

As a teenager, Owen Cardwell made history as one of the first Black students to attend E.C. Glass High School. Today, he continues to work on improving equity in public schools as a civil rights leader and scholar.

14 mins

Massive Resistance

Brian Daugherity (Virginia Commonwealth University)

In 1951, Barbara Johns led a student strike for equal education at Robert Russa Moton High School. Brian Daugherity explains how this small community in Prince Edward County came to be at the center of the national fight to end segregated schools.

12 mins

Token Desegregation

Dwana Waugh (Sweet Briar College)

Dwana Waugh has listened to countless oral histories from students who lived through desegregation. She says what struck her the most was the painful sense of loss African American students felt when leaving their all-black schools.

12 mins

This type of content is made possible by listeners like you. Please consider partnering with us and help enrich the lives of all our listeners nationwide.

Support With Good Reason