Episode

The Art of Historical Fiction

A special episode of “With Good Reason,” recorded live at the Virginia Festival of the Book in Charlottesville. NPR book critic Alan Cheuse (George Mason University) discusses his recent novel, …

Episode

Replay: “So… Beowulf?”

Beowulf, the most famous epic poem written in Old English, seems to be undergoing a revival. The recent movie featuring Angelina Jolie is just the tip of the iceberg. There …

Episode

The Road Less Traveled

US Highway 58 begins at the beaches of Hampton Roads and winds along the southern border of Virginia.  Author Joe Tennis (Virginia Highlands Community College) shares stories from this road, …

Episode

William Faulkner and Zelda Fitzgerald

William Faulkner was a rich presence on the University of Virginia grounds fifty years ago. Steve Railton (University of Virginia) discusses Faulkner’s influence on American literature and what the recordings …

Episode

To Kill A Mockingbird

The National Endowment for the Arts is encouraging all of us to read or re-read Harper Lee’s 1960 novel, that presents the Jim Crow south through the eyes of a …

Episode

Are the Classics Relevant?

Western civilization is founded on the thoughts and ideas of the ancient Greeks and Romans, but many scholars warn that the study of their languages is close to extinction in …

Episode

Replay: Southern Writing: Flannery O’Connor and Ellen Glasgow

She’s considered one of the best writers of the 20th century South, but Flannery O’Connor published only 32 short stories and two novels before she died in 1965 of complications from …

Episode

Christmas Songs and Stories

On this special holiday edition of With Good Reason, we feature an assortment of songs, stories and thoughts about Christmas. Jazz pianist John Toomey (Old Dominion University) plays his rendition of several …

Episode

Replay: Shakespeare and Race

Until recently, scholars assumed that the Elizabethans were both white and English and that they didn’t know people of color. But if that’s the case, why did Shakespeare, the best-known …

Episode

Southern Writing: Flannery O’Connor and Ellen Glasgow

She’s considered one of the best writers of the 20th century south, but Flannery O’Connor published only 32 short stories and two novels before she died in 1965 of complications …

Episode

Ethnic Impersonators and Carpetbaggers

Forrest Carter claimed The Education of Little Tree was a memoir of his childhood as a part Cherokee orphan. Some were shocked to later learn that Forrest Carter was, in fact, Asa …

Episode

Werewolves and Other Were-Creatures

Tales of humans who transform themselves into animals are common in the myths of many cultures. James Jordan (Longwood University) has researched “were-animal” stories as a historical phenomenon. Mack Swift (Blue Ridge Community …