Episode

‘Tis the Season, Again

We celebrate the holidays with a three-course feast for the mind. Like Scrooge, Charles Dickens knew the value of a penny. Annette Federico (James Madison University) looks at the circumstances under which …

Episode

Cruisin’ the Islands

For many the Caribbean remains a favorite winter destination. The word itself connotes images of white sandy beaches and warm, crystal clear waters. But what else do we know of …

Episode

In Other Words: Voice of Virginia Writers

Part I: Old Dominion University bestselling author Sheri Reynolds talks about life in the rural South and her book, The Rapture of Canaan. Find the segment audio here. Part II: Twice each year, the best …

Episode

The Fall Guy: Great Frame-Ups in History

John Wilkes Booth will forever be known as the assassin of Abraham Lincoln, but does history remember Samuel Mudd, the physician who set Booth’s leg and was tried as a …

Episode

School for Scandal? Literary Censorship in K-12 Curriculum

Each year, venerated literature, from Huckleberry Finn to Catcher in the Rye, is banned from school libraries around the country by parents and religious groups who find the content of these classics unfit …

Episode

Beyond Redemption? The Debate over Prisoner Rehabilitation

For the better part of a century Americans believed education and training would help criminal offenders turn their lives around. Today, however, Virginians have abolished parole, and the state spends …

Episode

Bound for Glory: New Books and Poetry by Virginia Writers

Part I: Novelist George Garrett of University of Virginia and poet Lucinda Roy of Virginia Tech discuss their latest works, the role of poetry in modern life and ways to encourage its appreciation among young …

Episode

Dark Passages: The Role of Evil in Literature

From ancient Greek epics to the latest best seller, depictions of evil have remained a staple of human literacy output. Why are we fascinated by what we fear? English professors Roy …

Episode

A Hold the Presses: Electronic Publishing and the Future of Books

As more Americans turn to their computers for information and entertainment, will printed books soon become obsolete? English professors Ed Falco of Virginia Tech, author of one of the first poetry volumes …

Episode

The Loneliest Number: Boredom and Social Phobias

Part I: University of Virginia English Professor Patricia Spacks discusses her new book, bravely titled Boredom: A Literary History of a State of Mind. Find the segment audio here. Part II: Mark McCormick, a Virginia …

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