Episode

Race – Our Most Difficult Question

Despite the positive legacy of the Civil Rights movement, race relations remain a vexing issue in American society. Virginia State University professors Renee Hill and Dirk Philipsen join noted journalist and George Mason University …

Episode

Mediating Conflict: The New Peacemakers

Can psychoanalytic principles help solve headline-making conflicts around the world? “Yes,” says Vamik Volkan (University of Virginia), author of Bloodlines. He discusses how the theories of Freud and others are being applied …

Episode

Lasting Impressions: The Spiritual Life of van Gogh

He was an eccentric painter, whose artistic creations were inspired by his lifelong religious struggle. As the National Gallery of Art unveils an historic van Gogh exhibit, religion professor Cliff Edwards (Virginia …

Episode

No Easy Assignment: Elementary School Reform in the ’90s

As the school year gets underway, Education school deans Gary Galluzzo of George Mason University and Elaine Witty of Norfolk State University offer a primer on how we’re educating our young …

Episode

Greek to Me: Teaching Foreign Language to Children

Foreign language is for kids. At least that’s what research shows. Children under age 10 learn languages better than adults who will always mentally translate into English. Susan St. Onge (Christopher Newport …

Episode

Down Time: The Origins and Future of Leisure

Leisure is a twentieth century phenomenon, according to historian Cindy Aron (University of Virginia), but few of us understand how to enjoy our free time. And, surprisingly, many people don’t realize they’ve …

Episode

In Other Words: Voice of Virginia Writers

Part I: Old Dominion University bestselling author Sheri Reynolds talks about life in the rural South and her book, The Rapture of Canaan. Find the segment audio here. Part II: Twice each year, the best …

Episode

Conquering Depression: The New Deal’s W.P.A. Program in Virginia

The Great Depression left thousands of Virginians out of work, from unskilled laborers to accomplished artists. The Works Progress Administration, a branch of FDR’s New Deal, sought to change that. …

Episode

Beyond Redemption? The Debate over Prisoner Rehabilitation

For the better part of a century Americans believed education and training would help criminal offenders turn their lives around. Today, however, Virginians have abolished parole, and the state spends …

Episode

It Doesn’t Add Up: The Role of Gender in Math Education

Do girls get inadvertently shortchanged on math education by teachers who feel boys are more adept and interested in the subject? Education professors Lee Doerries of Christopher Newport University and Marie Sheckels of Mary …

Episode

Images of Madness: Media and the Mentally Ill

From The Silence of the Lambs to news coverage of Jeffrey Dahmer case, the media paints a detailed and disturbing picture of mental illness. George Mason University sociologist Otto Wahl, author of Media Madness, …

Episode

Changing Places: Coal Towns and Appalachian Oral Tradition

Chronic underemployment and mass media threaten to erase unique cultures and traditions in mining towns throughout Appalachia. Scholars are racing to document the lives and lore of these communities before …