Episode

Replay: Poetic Justice

When writer and Invisibilia producer Lulu Miller discovered she’d be leaving Virginia, she wrote a startling love letter to the state–one that charges everyday people to stay angry about injustice.

Episode

Redlining and Reparations

The homeownership gap between whites and African Americans has exploded since the housing bust. It’s now wider than it was during the Jim Crow era.

Episode

Giving Birth While Black

Black women are three and a half times more likely to die in childbirth than white women. Even highly educated, wealthy black women are at a greater risk of complications than white women.

Episode

Furious Flower: A Celebration of the Greats of African American Poetry

On Sept. 27th and 28th, the most notable poets of our time will gather in the nation’s capital to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Furious Flower Poetry Center, the first academic center devoted to African American poetry in the United States.

Episode

400 Years After 1619

In late August 1619, twenty or more enslaved Africans arrived in Virginia at what’s now called Fort Monroe. We look at how the nation is commemorating those first Africans who arrived in British North America.

Episode

Poetic Justice

When writer and Invisibilia producer Lulu Miller discovered she’d be leaving Virginia, she wrote a startling love letter to the state–one that charges everyday people to stay angry about injustice.

Episode

Reconstructing Danville

Note: This episode contains descriptions of racial terror. This episode was produced in partnership with History United. History United is a project of Virginia Humanities, encouraging regional collaboration and building community trust through …

Episode

American Terrorism

In 1979 in Greensboro, North Carolina members of the KKK shot and killed five labor and civil rights activists. The city hasn’t forgotten.

Episode

1619, Past and Present

Episode

Replay: American Spirits

In this special holiday episode, we connect the present to the past as we uncover little-known stories of Virginia spirits, from a recently revived 19th-century julep recipe to an event that draws “women who whiskey.”

Episode

The Shondaland Revolution

From color-blind casting to deep social media relationships with viewers, the shows of Shonda Rhimes have changed TV.