Episode

Replay: Poetic Justice

When writer and Invisibilia producer Lulu Miller discovered she’d be leaving Virginia, she wrote a startling love letter to the state–one that charges everyday people to stay angry about injustice.

A smiling young man in an empty classroom removes a medical mask from his face.Episode

Back in Session

Despite fears of a virus resurgence, Virginia Tech and William & Mary both announced they will re-open in the Fall. What’s their plan for keeping students safe? And will higher education be forever changed?

Photo of a roadside historical marker in Norfolk, VA, that reads: Quarantine Road. This is a portion of the road to the first quarantine house in Virginia, established under the acts of the assembly of 1783, which required vessels coming from foreign ports to perform quarantine if there were reason to believe the ship was a carrier of infectious disease.Episode

Quarantine Road

An 1855 yellow fever outbreak in Virginia eerily mirrors the present-day quarantine. And Marie Antoinette often secluded herself with a secret trove of banned books.

Episode

Poetry that Heals

To some, poetry and medicine seem like opposites. But both science and poetry use language to understand deeper truths about the human condition.

Episode

Swipe Right for Love

For Valentine’s Day, we dispel the four myths about sex, discuss how to find love online, and pair wine and chocolate.

An individual meditates in a field with trees.Episode

Enter the Subconscious

Episode

Stirring the Pot

Home canning was always more than just necessity–a look back at history reveals the pride and creativity that went into stocking a pantry.

Episode

Gerry-rigged

Politicians from John F. Kennedy to Ronald Reagan have called gerrymandering a “cancer on our democracy.” It’s not a new issue, but everything from the way we draw lines to what’s considered legal has changed a lot in recent years.

Episode

Emoji Evidence

Be warned: everything you say on Facebook can and will be used against you in a court of law! A look at how courts handle digital evidence like social media posts and text messages.

Episode

Friendsgiving

For many, the Thanksgiving holidays are a time to gather with your biological relatives. But what if you don’t have the traditional, Norman-Rockwell family?

Episode

Stories to Tell in the Dark

A yellow-eyed witch who sucks the life from unknowing strangers; fish-obsessed ghosts who lure lone men to a watery death; and ghosts who call out in the voice of a loved-one, sealing a murderous fate. This week’s episode brings haunted stories for Halloween.

Episode

Roses in December

When we hear about the end of Jim Crow, we hear mostly about kids attending schools or about major court cases. But what did the process of legal desegregation look like in everyday life and culture?

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