With Good Reason

Hard Cider: Early America’s Drink of Choice
September 15th, 2012 - (3 Comments)

In the 18th century it was hard cider, not beer, that was the alcoholic beverage of choice. Even children often drank hard cider with breakfast and dinner because it was safer than the water. So how did this preference for hard cider disappear from the American palate? David Williams (George Mason University) investigates the demise […]

You Got To Move
December 24th, 2011 - (1 Comments)

There’s no doubt that the number of obese Americans has increased dramatically over the last 25 years – putting them at risk of high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, and osteoarthritis. But Cathy Roy (Longwood University) says it’s not necessarily the fat making people sick.  Her research suggests a lack of physical activity might be […]

You Got To Move
January 1st, 2011 - (1 Comments)

It’s time for New Year’s resolutions.  One of the most popular goals: a new diet.  There’s no doubt that the number of obese Americans has increased dramatically over the last 25 years – putting them at risk of high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, and osteoarthritis. But Cathy Roy (Longwood University) says it’s not necessarily […]

iCheat: Technology and Dishonor on Campus
November 6th, 2010 - (2 Comments)

Cell phone cameras, Wikipedia, and Google – today’s technology makes it easier for students to cheat.  Psychologist David Rettinger (University of Mary Washington) used to believe that teaching right from wrong was enough to deter it.  But his recent research suggests that’s not enough.  He says old-fashioned guilt, shame, and fear of getting caught are […]

Whitman at War
October 16th, 2010 - (1 Comments)

In 1862, poet Walt Whitman went to Fredericksburg, Virginia, searching for his brother George who had been wounded in a Civil War battle. Whitman was so moved by the carnage he found that he worked as a nurse for the rest of the war.   Mara Scanlon and Brady Earnhart (University of Mary Washington) say […]

Hard Cider: Early America’s Drink of Choice
July 3rd, 2010 - (9 Comments)

In the 18th century it was hard cider, not beer, that was the alcoholic beverage of choice. Even children often drank hard cider with breakfast and dinner because it was safer than the water. So how did this preference for hard cider disappear from the American palate? David Williams (George Mason University) investigates the demise […]

Autobiography as AutoFiction
March 6th, 2010 - (0 Comments)

Marc Lee Raphael (College of William and Mary) says our identities are formed by a narrative that we construct about ourselves that is part fiction and part fact.  In Raphael’s most recent book, Diary of a Los Angeles Jew, 1947-1972: Autobiography as Autofiction, the facts are his diary entries. The fiction is how Marc interprets […]

No Argument Here: Reviving Debate at Historically Black Colleges
February 6th, 2010 - (1 Comments)

James Farmer was the leader of the 1961 Freedom Rides that desegregated transportation in the South. His skilled oratory was shaped in part as a member of the legendary 1935 debate team portrayed in Denzel Washington’s 2007 feature film, The Great Debaters. Timothy O’Donnell (University of Mary Washington) is leading an effort to help historically […]

The Wright Brothers’ Sister
December 26th, 2009 - (0 Comments)

Wilbur and Orville Wright won a place in history for unraveling the secrets of heavier-than-air flight, but their charismatic sister, Katharine Wright, deserves a lot of credit.  Cindy Wilkey (University of Virginia’s College at Wise) says the brothers, who never married, were shy and reserved and that Katharine devoted her life to running their home […]

Whitman at War
July 4th, 2009 - (2 Comments)

In 1862, poet Walt Whitman went to Fredericksburg, Virginia, searching for his brother George who had been wounded in a Civil War battle. Whitman was so moved by the carnage he found that he worked as a nurse for the rest of the war.   Mara Scanlon and Brady Earnhart (University of Mary Washington) say […]