With Good Reason

America The Beautiful
June 27th, 2015 - (0 Comments)

From Marian Anderson’s 1939 concert at the Lincoln Memorial to Marvin Gaye’s singing of the National Anthem at the NBA Finals, the theme of patriotism can be heard throughout African American music. Benjamin Ross offers selections from this rich musical heritage. Also: Published in 1946, The Street by Ann Petry was the first million-selling novel […]

How to Save a City
May 23rd, 2015 - (0 Comments)

The first 24 hours after a city declares bankruptcy, there’s a reckoning: what gets to stay and what has to go. Frank Shafroth (George Mason University) walks us through what it’s like when a major city goes bankrupt and gives insight into the future of Detroit. And: While some people see social media as a […]

Imagining Yoko Ono
May 9th, 2015 - (0 Comments)

Yoko Ono is best known for her marriage to John Lennon and was vilified by the press in the 1960s for her perceived role in the breakup of the Beatles. Kevin Concannon (Virginia Tech), an expert on Ono’s work, notes she was an accomplished and innovative artist long before she met Lennon. Plus: A novel […]

How the Bard Meant It
January 31st, 2015 - (2 Comments)

Throughout 2014, Shakespeare’s 450th birthday inspired festivals and performances around the world. As the year of his birth comes to a close, we take a look back at how the Bard’s plays would have been performed in their day. David Crystal is a linguist and author who has researched Original Pronunciation, or OP, the accent […]

A Burnable Book
May 31st, 2014 - (5 Comments)

Murder, mystery, and poetry come together in medieval scholar Bruce Holsinger’s (University of Virginia) new novel set in Chaucer’s London. Plus, Faulkner Fox (Virginia Foundation for the Humanities) has a new novel that explores the complexity of race relations for southerners in the 1980s. And, Michael O’Donnell (University of Virginia’s College at Wise) has been […]

Sheer Good Fortune: Celebrating Toni Morrison
February 22nd, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison was born Chloe Wofford in 1931. She was 39 when she published her first novel about a black girl’s painful coming of age in a white society. The Bluest Eye and many subsequent works have earned Morrison the highest accolades in literature and established her as one of America’s leading fiction […]

Goodnight Moon!
March 23rd, 2013 - (2 Comments)

First published in 1947, Goodnight Moon has become one of the most popular books for young children. Yet the book’s author, Margaret Wise Brown, always wanted to write for adults. With Good Reason producer Kelley Libby tells the story of Brown’s life, from Hollins College to her tragic early death. Also featured: Opened after the […]

Victorians Get the Google Treatment
March 3rd, 2012 - (0 Comments)

How many Victorian books would you have to read to know the Victorians? What if you could read all 1.7 million? Fred Gibbs (George Mason University) co-created a project that does just that. Using digital tools, he can search and then chart how frequently certain words—like “God,” “love,” and “science”—appear in all of 19th-century British […]

Victorians Get the Google Treatment
March 12th, 2011 - (0 Comments)

How many Victorian books would you have to read to know the Victorians? What if you could read all 1.7 million? Fred Gibbs (George Mason University) co-created a project that does just that. Using digital tools, he can search and then chart how frequently certain words—like “God,” “love,” and “science”—appear in all of 19th-century British […]

The Future of the Book
February 12th, 2011 - (2 Comments)

Some say that books – that is, the printed, non-digital variety – are destined for the trash heap.  Call it the Age of the Kindle.  Ralph Cohen (James Madison University) spent a lifetime collecting books, many of them very rare.  But recently, after 70 years book collecting, he decided to give away thousands of them.  […]