With Good Reason

A Burnable Book
May 31st, 2014 - (5 Comments)

Murder, mystery, and poetry come together in medieval scholar Bruce Holsinger’s (University of Virginia) new novel set in Chaucer’s London. Plus, Faulkner Fox (Virginia Foundation for the Humanities) has a new novel that explores the complexity of race relations for southerners in the 1980s. And, Michael O’Donnell (University of Virginia’s College at Wise) has been […]

Sheer Good Fortune: Celebrating Toni Morrison
February 22nd, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison was born Chloe Wofford in 1931. She was 39 when she published her first novel about a black girl’s painful coming of age in a white society. The Bluest Eye and many subsequent works have earned Morrison the highest accolades in literature and established her as one of America’s leading fiction […]

Goodnight Moon!
March 23rd, 2013 - (0 Comments)

First published in 1947, Goodnight Moon has become one of the most popular books for young children. Yet the book’s author, Margaret Wise Brown, always wanted to write for adults. With Good Reason producer Kelley Libby tells the story of Brown’s life, from Hollins College to her tragic early death. Also featured: Opened after the […]

Victorians Get the Google Treatment
March 3rd, 2012 - (0 Comments)

How many Victorian books would you have to read to know the Victorians? What if you could read all 1.7 million? Fred Gibbs (George Mason University) co-created a project that does just that. Using digital tools, he can search and then chart how frequently certain words—like “God,” “love,” and “science”—appear in all of 19th-century British […]

Victorians Get the Google Treatment
March 12th, 2011 - (0 Comments)

How many Victorian books would you have to read to know the Victorians? What if you could read all 1.7 million? Fred Gibbs (George Mason University) co-created a project that does just that. Using digital tools, he can search and then chart how frequently certain words—like “God,” “love,” and “science”—appear in all of 19th-century British […]

The Future of the Book
February 12th, 2011 - (2 Comments)

Some say that books – that is, the printed, non-digital variety – are destined for the trash heap.  Call it the Age of the Kindle.  Ralph Cohen (James Madison University) spent a lifetime collecting books, many of them very rare.  But recently, after 70 years book collecting, he decided to give away thousands of them.  […]

Poetry in a Recession
December 25th, 2010 - (0 Comments)

Poetry has long been used to celebrate love and family, but it has also always documented the dark times in human life.  Bob Hicok (Virginia Tech) worked for twenty years in the automotive industry.  His poems explore the lives of family and friends coping with economic devastation in Michigan.  Also: Many scholars have believed that […]

Whitman at War
October 16th, 2010 - (1 Comments)

In 1862, poet Walt Whitman went to Fredericksburg, Virginia, searching for his brother George who had been wounded in a Civil War battle. Whitman was so moved by the carnage he found that he worked as a nurse for the rest of the war.   Mara Scanlon and Brady Earnhart (University of Mary Washington) say […]

It’s All Greek To Me
August 28th, 2010 - (3 Comments)

Don Quixote, conqueror of windmills and readers’ hearts, was recently voted the best book of all time in a survey of 100 of the world’s best authors.  It’s the tale of a Spanish knight who reads one too many chivalric romances and takes up a rusty breastplate and sword in search of adventures.  Antonio Carreño-Rodríguez […]

Poetry in a Recession
April 10th, 2010 - (1 Comments)

From Homer to Chaucer to Rita Dove, poetry has plumbed and expressed human strife, love, and everyday realities.  Bob Hicok (Virginia Tech) worked for twenty years in the automotive industry.  His poems explore the lives of family and friends coping with economic devastation in Michigan.  Also: Kevin Shortsleeve (Christopher Newport University) is co-editing an anthology […]