With Good Reason

Goodnight Moon!
March 23rd, 2013 - (0 Comments)

First published in 1947, Goodnight Moon has become one of the most popular books for young children. Yet the book’s author, Margaret Wise Brown, always wanted to write for adults. With Good Reason producer Kelley Libby tells the story of Brown’s life, from Hollins College to her tragic early death. Also featured: Opened after the […]

Children Seen and Heard
June 19th, 2010 - (0 Comments)

Historians have long held that children of 17 th and 18 th century Europe were thought of as incomplete adults who were not yet worthy of love or compassion. However, historian Michael Galgano (James Madison University) says actually children were understood to be in a different stage of life, and they were celebrated and loved.  […]

The American Graduation Initiative
March 13th, 2010 - (0 Comments)

The federal government unveiled a 12 billion dollar initiative last summer to add 5 million new community college graduates by 2020.   Frank Friedman (Piedmont Virginia Community College) says community college enrollment has exploded during the recession, but colleges are struggling to keep up with the demand for faculty and facilities. Also featured: Realizing that most […]

By Definition: The Racial Integrity Act of 1924
February 20th, 2010 - (6 Comments)

Passed at the height of the eugenics movement, the Racial Integrity Act proclaimed the existence of only two racial categories in Virginia—”colored” and white.  The law stripped Native Americans, and members of other groups with dark skin, of their land, voting rights, and legal identity.  David Smith (Longwood University) and anthropologist Helen Rountree (Old Dominion […]

Women at War
January 23rd, 2010 - (0 Comments)

Women journalists who covered the Vietnam War are often not given their proper due when the history of the conflict is told.  Joyce Hoffman (Old Dominion University) is the author of On Their Own:  Women Journalists in Vietnam. She shares stories of women who won esteemed prizes for their reporting and several who broke new […]

Every Move You Make
May 23rd, 2009 - (3 Comments)

Each day most of us wave to a friend or gesture in a meeting with colleagues. Dance professor Karen Studd (George Mason University) sees patterns and language in all of these acts. She calls her system for observing, describing, notating, and understanding movement “Laban Movement Analysis.” Also: Choreographer and professor Benita Brown (Virginia State University) […]

To Test or Not to Test?
May 16th, 2009 - (0 Comments)

Genetic testing of our risks for disease is the latest trend in medicine. The technique offers hope for some, but also raises medical, ethical, psychological, and practical concerns for many, including whether genetic information is worth acquiring. Doris Teichler Zallen (Virginia Tech) is the author of a new book, To Test or Not To Test, […]

You’re Starting to Show…
November 8th, 2008 - (1 Comments)

While the media may cover mega-celebrity Angelina Jolie’s pregnancy with loving attention to every detail, mere mortal women still face prejudice and even outright hostility in our society during pregnancy. Eden King (George Mason University) says this is not only counter-productive; it’s illegal. Also, Nicole Karjane (Virginia Commonwealth University) offers insights into pregnancy and labor […]

Children Seen and Heard
August 30th, 2008 - (0 Comments)

Historians have long held that children of 17 th and 18 th century Europe were thought of as incomplete adults who were not yet worthy of love or compassion. However, historian Michael Galgano (James Madison University) says actually children were understood to be in a different stage of life, and they were celebrated and loved. […]

Autism in Contemporary Film, Literature – and Life
August 23rd, 2008 - (3 Comments)

One in every 150 American-born children is diagnosed with an autism-spectrum disorder. Christofer Foss (University of Mary Washington) has examined how autism is portrayed in contemporary literature and film and says it is time to re-think difference, dignity, discrimination, and other disability issues. Also: Nicole Myers (University of Mary Washington) says with proper training, teachers […]