Aired: November 22, 2014

Giving Thanks—or Miigwetch

  • Miigwetch (14 min.)

    With: Anton Treuer

    What does Native American heritage food look like, and how is giving thanks a part of it? Anton Treuer, author of Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians But Were Afraid to Ask, shares how he and his family give thanks.

    Segment:
  • Frybread Please (4 min.)

    With: Karenne Wood (Virginia Foundation for the Humanities)

    Karenne Wood gives a hands-on lesson in the art and history of fry bread.

    Segment:
  • Pre-Contact Cuisine (8 min.)

    With: Sean Sheram

    Minnesota Chef Sean Sherman (the Sioux Chef) gives us a taste of pre-contact American Indian cuisine.

    Segment:
  • 100 Mile Thanksgiving

    An oldie but goodie from our archives… With Good Reason invites you to a traditional Thanksgiving meal, but nearly everything on the table is grown, made, or brewed within 100 miles of our studios in Charlottesville, Virginia. The dinner host, Tim Beatley (University of Virginia), introduced the 100-mile Thanksgiving idea to his students after reading The 100-mile Diet: A Year of Local Eating. About 95 miles east, in Petersburg, Reza Rafie and Chris Mullins (Virginia State University) train farmers to use greenhouse-like structures called High Tunnels to grow high-profit margin berries and other exotic fruits and vegetables year-round. Sixty miles west, Maria Papadakis (James Madison University) visits an energy-efficient turkey farm in the Shenandoah Valley to showcase ways farmers can save money while doing their part to conserve natural resources.

     

    Want to learn more about “the first Thanksgiving?” From our friends at Encyclopedia Virginia:

     

    – If you’re interested in Virginia’s relationship to Thanksgiving, then check out this document, orders related to the settlement of Berkeley Plantation late in 1619 that specifically “ordaine that the day of our ships arrivall at the place assigned for plantation in the land of Virginia shall be yearly and perpetualy kept holy as a day of thanksgiuing to Almighty god.”

     

    – As for the Virginian who made the “First Thanksgiving” a thing in Virginia, that was John J. Wicker Jr., a Richmond lawyer who in 1962 sent a telegram to JFK scolding the president for crediting Pilgrims instead of Virginians. Kennedy corrected himself the next year.

    Segment:

Discussion

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

XHTML: You can use these tags <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

This blog is kept spam free by WP-SpamFree.