Aired: September 1, 2017

Bicycle Fever at the Turn of the Century

  • Bicycle Fever (12 min.)

    With: Evan Friss (James Madison University)

    In the late nineteenth century, Americans caught bicycle fever. Evan Friss is the author of The Cycling City, about the 1890s when American cities were home to more cyclists than anywhere else in the world.

    Segment:
  • An Animated Life (15 min.)

    With: "Tuck" Tucker (Longwood University)

    Veteran animator “Tuck” Tucker talks about illustrating many of the most popular cartoons in recent times, including Spongebob Squarepants, Hey Arnold!, The Ren and Stimpy Show, and The Simpsons. 

    Segment:
  • The Disappearing Lake (7 min.)

    With: Skip Watts and George Stephenson (Radford University)

    There’s a scene in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing when a dance instructor lifts his young student in a beautiful lake at sunset. Today, that lake is disappearing and Skip Watts and George Stephenson are studying why.

    Segment:
  • Planning for Sea Rise (5 min.)

    With: Ray Toll (Old Dominion University)

    Virginia’s shoreline is expecting a sea level rise of as much as three feet or more by 2060. Ray Toll is leading a comprehensive local response to the flooding that will be used as a model for the rest of the nation.

    Segment:
  • Behind the Big Game Reserves (11 min.)

    With: Stephen Macekura (Indiana University)

    The earliest environmentalists weren’t tree-huggers – they were hunters and colonialists. Historian Stephen Macekura traces how African conservation has been closely tied with colonialism and development.

    Segment:
  • SpongeBob to the Rescue

    Our guest Tuck Tucker has illustrated for shows ranging from The Little Mermaid to The Ren and Stimpy Show. He even worked as an animator for SpongeBob SquarePants, and you can get a glimpse of SpongeBob’s world in this clip from The SpongeBob Movie.

  • An Animated Life

    What do The Simpsons, SpongeBob SquarePants, and He-Man have in common with Longwood University? Why it’s Tuck Tucker, the animator!

Discussion

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