With Good Reason

Post archive for ‘Science’

Haints
July 13th, 2013 - (0 Comments)

A tornado that devastated Fayetteville, Tennessee the week author Clint McCown (Virginia Commonwealth University) was born is the setting for his latest award-winning novel, Haints. The real-life tornado reached wind speeds up to 260 miles per hour and damaged or destroyed 1,820 buildings. Also: Biologist Wally Smith (University of Virginia College at Wise) fell in […]

Not Just for the Birds
July 6th, 2013 - (1 Comments)

New research shows one key to curtailing West Nile disease may lie in increasing the diversity of birds. John Swaddle (College of William and Mary) says attracting a variety of birds to your back yard may actually lower your chance of getting the disease. Also featured: Ann and Rob Simpson (Lord Fairfax Community College) are […]

Those Who Can…Teach
June 22nd, 2013 - (0 Comments)

Much bigger than technology or classroom space, the most important factor in determining student success is having a good teacher. In two 15-minute sessions, Bob Pianta (University of Virginia) can tell whether a teacher is good or bad—regardless of their subject matter. Plus: Heralded by Time as one of the ten best college presidents, Freeman […]

The Art of Science
June 8th, 2013 - (1 Comments)

  Sometimes all it takes to get kids excited about science is a bag full of eyeballs. Robert Tai (University of Virginia) has spent years studying when and why kids fall in love with science. Henry Alan Rowe (Norfolk State University) uses fire and static electricity to draw students into chemistry. Plus: Science class matters […]

Rainbows On Demand
May 4th, 2013 - (0 Comments)

Michael Jones McKean (Virginia Commonwealth University) is an artist whose work is a simple, but phenomenal visual event: he creates rainbows that can arc up to 400 feet in height. For over two weeks last summer, his rainbows in downtown Omaha, Nebraska could be seen from a thousand feet away. Also featured: If you’ve ever […]

Dead Zones and Fly-fishing
April 20th, 2013 - (0 Comments)

You can’t see them on the surface. But at the bottom of some of the world’s largest bodies of water are areas called dead zones where fish and other life can’t survive. Robert Diaz (College of William & Mary) tracks the development of these dead zones, which are rapidly increasing. He says agricultural runoff and […]

Do the Math
April 13th, 2013 - (0 Comments)

Civil rights activist Bob Moses (The Algebra Project) famously helped organize a voter registration drive in Mississippi that changed the political landscape for the black community. He also believed that something else was necessary for full citizenship in society: math literacy. Oliver Hill (Virginia State University) agrees that learning algebra is a civil right. Also […]

Not Your Mother’s Shop Class
April 6th, 2013 - (0 Comments)

Shop class 20 years ago meant hacksaws and hammers, but the shop class of 2013 is about teaching innovation and creation through computer programming, 3D printers, and maybe even Legos. A leader in this new kind of education, Mano Talaiver (Longwood University) teaches kids how to program LED lights to customize clothing. Also featured: Not […]

2013: The Year of the Stink Bug?
March 2nd, 2013 - (0 Comments)

  USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Laboratory / Animals Photos / CC BY 2013 is predicted to be a record year in terms of stink bug population in the U.S. Entomologist Ames Herbert (Virginia Tech) is looking at ways to control this voracious insect, which has caused millions of dollars in crop damage. Also featured: […]

Edna the Engineer: Who Gets to be a Scientist?
February 9th, 2013 - (2 Comments)

brewbooks / Foter.com / CC BY-SA In 2009, fewer than 2% of physical science degrees—like physics and chemistry—went to African-Americans. Considering African-Americans make up 12% of the U.S. population, these numbers are shockingly low. And they’re getting even lower. In the second episode of our ongoing series about STEM education, we ask: what does a […]