With Good Reason

Post archive for ‘History’

Dreams of the Civil War
November 2nd, 2013 - (0 Comments)

Mom’s home cooking, wives’ infidelities, and slaves dining with white families—Jonathan White (Christopher Newport University) says you can write a whole history of the Civil War through the dreams of people who lived through it. Also featured: Jesse James was a thief and a cold-blooded killer who gunned down unarmed civilians. So why did newspapers […]

The Legacy of Massive Resistance
October 19th, 2013 - (4 Comments)

In 1951 a group of African American students at Robert R. Moton High School in Prince Edward County, Virginia, organized a strike to protest the substandard school facilities provided for black students. The walkout, led by 16-year-old Barbara Johns, is one of the great stories in the struggle for Civil Rights—a story of courage and persistence […]

Logos: Then and Now
August 24th, 2013 - (0 Comments)

The power of logos and branding wasn’t lost on the ancients. Bruce MacDonald (Virginia Military Institute) says after William the Conqueror defeated Harold, the Saxon king, William wisely combined the crests of the two forces into a new British logo—two winged lions on a yellow field—which helped him unify and govern his new land. Also […]

Jazz and Civil Rights
August 17th, 2013 - (0 Comments)

Antonio Garcia (Virginia Commonwealth University) says that the personal and professional lives of musicians such as Louis Armstrong, Miles Davis, and John Coltrane cannot be divorced from the struggle for racial equality—they contributed in significant ways to interracial understanding and social progress.  Also featured: The composers of the Civil Rights anthem “Lift Every Voice and […]

Modern-Day Slavery
July 20th, 2013 - (0 Comments)

  Most of us learned in history class that slavery in the U.S. ended with the Thirteenth Amendment. But the trade in human beings—for sex and labor—is actually the fastest growing criminal industry in the world today, and it’s happening just below the surface of our everyday lives. Author Corban Addison confronts human trafficking in […]

Not Just for the Birds
July 6th, 2013 - (1 Comments)

New research shows one key to curtailing West Nile disease may lie in increasing the diversity of birds. John Swaddle (College of William and Mary) says attracting a variety of birds to your back yard may actually lower your chance of getting the disease. Also featured: Ann and Rob Simpson (Lord Fairfax Community College) are […]

From Combat to College
June 29th, 2013 - (0 Comments)

With the end of the War in Iraq, tens of thousands of soldiers have returned home, and many of them are going to college. But the transition to academia can be hard. Alexis Hart and Roger Thompson (Virginia Military Institute) are traveling the country, coaching professors on how to welcome and support veterans. And: Kurt […]

The Legacy of FDR
May 25th, 2013 - (0 Comments)

An entire generation of Americans grew up knowing no other president than Franklin Roosevelt, who served four terms and led them through the Depression and World War II. Pulitzer Prize winning FDR biographer David Kennedy (Stanford University) gives a spellbinding account of this ebullient man of constant cheer who crafted the New Deal and the […]

Red Ink
March 16th, 2013 - (0 Comments)

A common historical myth is that Native Americans were an “oral people” and did not engage in literacy. In his new book Red Ink: Native Americans Picking Up the Pen in the Colonial Period, Drew Lopenzina  (Old Dominion University) argues that Native Americans early on acquired the skills of reading and writing in an effort […]

The Gospel Roots of Rock and Roll
February 16th, 2013 - (2 Comments)

Jazz Archive at Duke University / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA Sister Rosetta Tharpe attained great popularity in the 1930s and 1940s with her gospel recordings that were a unique mixture of spiritual lyrics and early rock and roll. She became the first superstar of gospel music and was an early influence on Elvis Presley, Jerry […]