With Good Reason

Post archive for ‘History’

Black in Cuba
December 29th, 2012 - (0 Comments)

Two years after his 1959 speech at the Havana Labor Rally Fidel Castro declared that the age of racism and discrimination was over. Geoffroy de Laforcade (Norfolk State University) and William Alexander (Norfolk State University) discuss the validity of Castro’s declaration in today’s Cuba. They are part of a program where students from Norfolk State University, […]

After the Berlin Wall Came Down
December 1st, 2012 - (1 Comments)

More than 20 years after Germans tore down the Berlin Wall, they are still negotiating how to deal with the stigmas of a formerly divided country. Jason James (University of Mary Washington) says there are still divisions within German culture—between the “good” former West Germans and the “bad” former East Germans—and both sides struggle with […]

Master of the Mountain
November 10th, 2012 - (0 Comments)

The new book Master of the Mountain: Thomas Jefferson and his Slaves is based on new information from archaeological work at Monticello and on hitherto overlooked or disregarded evidence in Jefferson’s papers. Henry Wiencek (Virginia Foundation for the Humanities Fellow) creates a portrait of the founding father that challenges the long-held perception of Thomas Jefferson […]

The Legacy of Massive Resistance
October 20th, 2012 - (0 Comments)

When faced with a court order to integrate, Prince Edward County in Virginia closed its entire school system in 1959 rather than integrate. The closure lasted five years and was part of a larger policy enacted by the state called Massive Resistance. Larissa Smith Fergeson (Longwood University) speaks to people who were students in Prince […]

1619: The Making of America
October 13th, 2012 - (0 Comments)

1619 was the year the first Africans arrived on the North American continent. There were at least 20 of them and they came as slaves from Angola. But what’s often overlooked is the culture they brought with them. Many were Christians with European names like Jean Pedro and Angela, and some came from cities. Scholars […]

The Coming Prosperity
September 29th, 2012 - (0 Comments)

In spite of the current state of the economy, the next 25 years will see an unprecedented rise in human wellbeing. That’s the argument Philip Auerswald (George Mason University) makes in his new book The Coming Prosperity. He argues that four centuries of technological change are spreading prosperity to new populations in the world and […]

Hard Cider: Early America’s Drink of Choice
September 15th, 2012 - (3 Comments)

In the 18th century it was hard cider, not beer, that was the alcoholic beverage of choice. Even children often drank hard cider with breakfast and dinner because it was safer than the water. So how did this preference for hard cider disappear from the American palate? David Williams (George Mason University) investigates the demise […]

Grave Matters
March 24th, 2012 - (0 Comments)

The Victorians photographed their dead before burial.  Abraham Lincoln’s death might have popularized embalming.  Some people today have their ashes made into diamonds. Bernard Means (Virginia Commonwealth University) studies how and why we bury our dead – and how that’s changed over the last few centuries. Plus: A trip to some orphan graveyards – forgotten places […]

Victorians Get the Google Treatment
March 3rd, 2012 - (0 Comments)

How many Victorian books would you have to read to know the Victorians? What if you could read all 1.7 million? Fred Gibbs (George Mason University) co-created a project that does just that. Using digital tools, he can search and then chart how frequently certain words—like “God,” “love,” and “science”—appear in all of 19th-century British […]

Showdown in Virginia
February 25th, 2012 - (1 Comments)

The election of Abraham Lincoln as President touched off a secession crisis in the South.  In his book Showdown in Virginia, Bill Freehling (Virginia Foundation for the Humanities) focuses on turning points in Virginia’s months-long, bitter battle over whether to secede from the Union. Also: Historians estimate that of the nearly 5,000 pirates who terrorized America’s […]