With Good Reason

Post archive for ‘History’

Red Ink
March 16th, 2013 - (0 Comments)

A common historical myth is that Native Americans were an “oral people” and did not engage in literacy. In his new book Red Ink: Native Americans Picking Up the Pen in the Colonial Period, Drew Lopenzina  (Old Dominion University) argues that Native Americans early on acquired the skills of reading and writing in an effort […]

The Gospel Roots of Rock and Roll
February 16th, 2013 - (2 Comments)

Jazz Archive at Duke University / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA Sister Rosetta Tharpe attained great popularity in the 1930s and 1940s with her gospel recordings that were a unique mixture of spiritual lyrics and early rock and roll. She became the first superstar of gospel music and was an early influence on Elvis Presley, Jerry […]

Dialing Through the Years
January 19th, 2013 - (0 Comments)

If the inventor of radio had not been so stubborn, perhaps 1,600 souls would not have perished when the Titanic sank in the icy Atlantic 100 years ago. Bill Kovarik (Radford University) looks at the history of radio and its effects on American politics and popular culture. Also featured: Local sports segments have been a […]

Brigham Young: American Moses?
January 12th, 2013 - (2 Comments)

Brigham Young was a rough-hewn transient from New York whose life was electrified by the Mormon faith. He married more than 50 women, and transformed a barren desert into his vision of the Kingdom of God. In his new biography Brigham Young: Pioneer Prophet, John Turner (George Mason University) explores Young’s thirty-year battle with the […]

Black in Cuba
December 29th, 2012 - (0 Comments)

Two years after his 1959 speech at the Havana Labor Rally Fidel Castro declared that the age of racism and discrimination was over. Geoffroy de Laforcade (Norfolk State University) and William Alexander (Norfolk State University) discuss the validity of Castro’s declaration in today’s Cuba. They are part of a program where students from Norfolk State University, […]

After the Berlin Wall Came Down
December 1st, 2012 - (1 Comments)

More than 20 years after Germans tore down the Berlin Wall, they are still negotiating how to deal with the stigmas of a formerly divided country. Jason James (University of Mary Washington) says there are still divisions within German culture—between the “good” former West Germans and the “bad” former East Germans—and both sides struggle with […]

Master of the Mountain
November 10th, 2012 - (0 Comments)

The new book Master of the Mountain: Thomas Jefferson and his Slaves is based on new information from archaeological work at Monticello and on hitherto overlooked or disregarded evidence in Jefferson’s papers. Henry Wiencek (Virginia Foundation for the Humanities Fellow) creates a portrait of the founding father that challenges the long-held perception of Thomas Jefferson […]

The Legacy of Massive Resistance
October 20th, 2012 - (0 Comments)

When faced with a court order to integrate, Prince Edward County in Virginia closed its entire school system in 1959 rather than integrate. The closure lasted five years and was part of a larger policy enacted by the state called Massive Resistance. Larissa Smith Fergeson (Longwood University) speaks to people who were students in Prince […]

1619: The Making of America
October 13th, 2012 - (0 Comments)

1619 was the year the first Africans arrived on the North American continent. There were at least 20 of them and they came as slaves from Angola. But what’s often overlooked is the culture they brought with them. Many were Christians with European names like Jean Pedro and Angela, and some came from cities. Scholars […]

The Coming Prosperity
September 29th, 2012 - (0 Comments)

In spite of the current state of the economy, the next 25 years will see an unprecedented rise in human wellbeing. That’s the argument Philip Auerswald (George Mason University) makes in his new book The Coming Prosperity. He argues that four centuries of technological change are spreading prosperity to new populations in the world and […]