With Good Reason

Post archive for ‘History’

Giving Thanks—or Miigwetch
November 22nd, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Gathered around the Thanksgiving table, Americans tell stories about colonists and Native Americans coming together. But do Native Americans even celebrate Thanksgiving? And what would Native American heritage food look like? This November, With Good Reason takes a look at the indigenous side of a Thanksgiving table. Anton Treuer, author of Everything You Wanted to […]

Plague After War
November 15th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Fears of an Ebola outbreak in the U.S. have mostly subsided, but in some parts of West Africa, the epidemic is growing faster than ever. Jim Hentz (Virginia Military Institute) studies the nature of war in Africa and says the spread of Ebola in countries like Sierra Leone and Liberia mirrors that of conflict in […]

Witches, Slaves, and Heroines
November 8th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Join us for a sampler of Norfolk State University’s 1619:The Making of America conference, including the myths and truths behind the lives of two native women—Pocahontas and Tituba—by Page Laws (Norfolk State University), a brief history of human slavery by Paul Finkelman (University of Pennsylvania), and three remarkable enslaved women in Canada who fought back […]

Slaves Waiting for Sale
November 1st, 2014 - (1 Comments)

In 1853, Eyre Crowe, a British artist, visited a slave auction in Richmond, Virginia. His painting of the scene was later exhibited at the Royal Gallery in London in 1861. In her new book Slaves Waiting for Sale: Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade, Maurie McInnis (University of Virginia) describes the impact this pivotal painting had on the […]

Horror in the Hills
October 18th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Emily Satterwhite (Virginia Tech) talks about two very different images of Appalachia: the pastoral, small towns of literature and the often violent cannibals of horror films. And: In the mid-90s, Latino immigrants started to migrate to smaller towns in the South. Barbara Ellen Smith (Virginia Tech) says the new Appalachia includes chicken enchiladas and tamales. Plus: […]

Summer Melt and the Z-Degree
September 13th, 2014 - (1 Comments)

Bob Templin (Northern Virginia Community College) is president of one of the largest community colleges in the nation. He’s launched an innovative program that prepares the burgeoning population of Latino high school students for college. And: Too many low-income students who graduate from high school with the intent of attending college in the fall never […]

Brigham Young: American Moses?
September 6th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Brigham Young was a rough-hewn transient from New York who was electrified by the Mormon faith. He married more than 50 women, and transformed a barren desert into his vision of the Kingdom of God. In his biography Brigham Young: Pioneer Prophet, John Turner (George Mason University) explores Young’s thirty-year battle with the U.S Government […]

When America Took to the Air
August 30th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

In the years after World War I, stunt pilots in small airplanes would fly throughout the country, performing tricks and selling rides to locals—introducing Americans to flight for the first time. By the end of World War II, says Historian Houston Johnson (Virginia Military Institute), air travel and airports were commonplace, in large part because […]

Patrick Henry’s “Thunder Speech”
August 23rd, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Thomas Jefferson said Patrick Henry “got the ball of revolution rolling.” Henry was five times elected governor of colonial Virginia, but it was his ability to electrify an audience that made him the idol of the common people. Historian John Ragosta (Robert C. Vaughan Fellow at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities) is writing a […]

Messages From a Forgotten Troopship
May 24th, 2014 - (7 Comments)

In the 1960s, it took almost three weeks to cross the sea from America to Vietnam. Three weeks for young men in crowded cabins with salt water showers and absolutely nothing to do but think about home, the war, and what might be next. In this Memorial Day special episode we focus on a single […]