With Good Reason

Post archive for ‘Arts & Culture’

Viva Voce and Civil War Selfies
April 5th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Today when we vote, we enter a private space, secretly make our choice, and go about our day. Don Debats (Virginia Foundation for the Humanities Fellow) explains that early voting wasn’t just public; it was a raucous, drunken community festival. Plus: It’s hard to find a smile in a 19th century photograph—instead, you’ll see stern […]

Extreme Nursing in Bush Alaska
March 15th, 2014 - (1 Comments)

There is an extreme shortage of nurses in “bush” Alaska, a stunningly beautiful part of the world only reachable by plane or barge.  Maria DeValpine (James Madison University) has spent the last three years learning why nurses elect to stay in this challenging environment on the edge of the earth. And: Courses that include service learning […]

Sheer Good Fortune: Celebrating Toni Morrison
February 22nd, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison was born Chloe Wofford in 1931. She was 39 when she published her first novel about a black girl’s painful coming of age in a white society. The Bluest Eye and many subsequent works have earned Morrison the highest accolades in literature and established her as one of America’s leading fiction […]

Brow Anxiety
February 15th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

During the 1910s and 1920s, the question of whether one was “highbrow” or “lowbrow” became a concern in the minds of modernist Americans. Brooks Hefner (James Madison University) says this “brow anxiety” dominated the career of Willard Huntington Wright, who fancied himself an intellectual aristocrat while secretly writing a series of wildly popular detective stories […]

I Am…In Love
February 8th, 2014 - (3 Comments)

Sonali Gulati’s (Virginia Commonwealth University) new film, I Am, chronicles her personal journey to Delhi, India, where she confronts the loss of her mother whom she never came out to as gay. And: For parents who are gay or transgendered, the act of coming out to their adult children can be scary. Jennifer Apperson and […]

Nuts and Bolts: Our Brains on STEM
January 18th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

What if you could change not just how much you know, but your actual intelligence? Psychologist Oliver Hill (Virginia State University) believes that special cognitive training can rewire the way brains work and help kids succeed in math and science. And: Stereotypes affect the way others see us and the way we see ourselves. They can also lead to lower […]

10 Cents a Dance
December 28th, 2013 - (0 Comments)

During and despite the Great Depression, the entertainment industry produced what some consider the greatest era of popular music. Elliot Majerczyk (Virginia Foundation for the Humanities) looks at the songs that became the soundtrack of the ‘lost generation’ and helped pull America through hard times. Also: Nigel Sellars (Christopher Newport University) explains that Roosevelt’s New Deal originally […]

Christmas Music and Memories
December 21st, 2013 - (0 Comments)

Whether it’s a traditional hymn or a holiday song from our childhood, many people say Christmas just wouldn’t be Christmas without the music that marks this season. The sense of joy, comfort, or spiritual uplift comes in all kinds of music at this time of year. From a Charlie Brown Christmas to Donny Hathaway and carols […]

The Art of Giving
December 7th, 2013 - (0 Comments)

As the holidays approach, the pressure’s on to find perfect gifts for your loved ones. Marketing professor Kim Weaver (Virginia Tech) says if you’re thinking about adding a candy bar in with that fancy cashmere sweater you’re sending Mom—think again. Plus: Sometimes translating difficult scientific research to the public is all about presentation. Jenifer Alonzo […]

Adoption in America
November 23rd, 2013 - (0 Comments)

With the success of TV shows like Modern Family and Parenthood, it’s clear that the way Americans think of family is starting to change. Yet, Linda Seligmann’s (George Mason University) new book shows that for transracial and transnational adoptions, there are still many cultural barriers.  Also featured: Longwood University senior Carmen Balogh talks about what it was like growing up in a blended family. […]