With Good Reason

Post archive for ‘Arts & Culture’

Imagining Yoko Ono
May 10th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Yoko Ono is best known for her marriage to John Lennon and was vilified by the press in the 1960s for her perceived role in the breakup of the Beatles. Kevin Concannon (Virginia Tech), an expert on Ono’s work, notes she was an accomplished and innovative artist long before she met Lennon. Plus: A new […]

Evicted from the Mountains
May 3rd, 2014 - (4 Comments)

When Shenandoah National Park was built, hundreds of families were forced off their land. Margaret Marangione (Blue Ridge Community College) says new information has emerged suggesting that some of those displaced people were sent to state colonies and sterilized. Plus: Veterans of the Revolutionary War collected the nation’s first pensions for wounded soldiers. But Benjamin […]

A Jealous Kind of Love
April 26th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

When it comes to love, jealousy is sometimes thought of as “natural” or even desirable. But a recent survey led by Mindy Erchull (University of Mary Washington) suggests that women who see jealousy as a positive thing may be more likely to find themselves in abusive relationships. Also: Tragedies like the Newtown shootings dominate the […]

Hip Hop, You Don’t Stop
April 19th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

American-invented hip hop music is now an international phenomenon with rappers in countries like Japan and Senegal. Kevin Kosanovich (College of William and Mary) traces hip hop’s roots, focusing on how it is expressed in different regions of our country, from California to New York, and even in Virginia. And: Rapper Tupac Shakur was gunned […]

Bible Babel
April 12th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

In her book Bible Babel: Making Sense of the Most Talked About Book of All Time, Kristin Swenson explains what the Bible is, where it comes from, and how it’s relevant today. Also featured: Edward Neukrug (Old Dominion University) has collected oral histories of colleagues and former patients of some of the great psychologists of […]

Viva Voce and Civil War Selfies
April 5th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Today when we vote, we enter a private space, secretly make our choice, and go about our day. Don Debats (Virginia Foundation for the Humanities Fellow) explains that early voting wasn’t just public; it was a raucous, drunken community festival. Plus: It’s hard to find a smile in a 19th century photograph—instead, you’ll see stern […]

Extreme Nursing in Bush Alaska
March 15th, 2014 - (1 Comments)

There is an extreme shortage of nurses in “bush” Alaska, a stunningly beautiful part of the world only reachable by plane or barge.  Maria DeValpine (James Madison University) has spent the last three years learning why nurses elect to stay in this challenging environment on the edge of the earth. And: Courses that include service learning […]

Sheer Good Fortune: Celebrating Toni Morrison
February 22nd, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison was born Chloe Wofford in 1931. She was 39 when she published her first novel about a black girl’s painful coming of age in a white society. The Bluest Eye and many subsequent works have earned Morrison the highest accolades in literature and established her as one of America’s leading fiction […]

Brow Anxiety
February 15th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

During the 1910s and 1920s, the question of whether one was “highbrow” or “lowbrow” became a concern in the minds of modernist Americans. Brooks Hefner (James Madison University) says this “brow anxiety” dominated the career of Willard Huntington Wright, who fancied himself an intellectual aristocrat while secretly writing a series of wildly popular detective stories […]

I Am…In Love
February 8th, 2014 - (3 Comments)

Sonali Gulati’s (Virginia Commonwealth University) new film, I Am, chronicles her personal journey to Delhi, India, where she confronts the loss of her mother whom she never came out to as gay. And: For parents who are gay or transgendered, the act of coming out to their adult children can be scary. Jennifer Apperson and […]