With Good Reason

Post archive for ‘Arts & Culture’

How the Bard Meant It
January 31st, 2015 - (0 Comments)

Throughout 2014, Shakespeare’s 450th birthday inspired festivals and performances around the world. As the year of his birth comes to a close, we take a look back at how the Bard’s plays would have been performed in their day. David Crystal is a linguist and author who has researched Original Pronunciation, or OP, the accent […]

Where Did You Come From?
January 24th, 2015 - (1 Comments)

“Where Did You Come From?” is the title of the first track on Suz Slezak’s upcoming collection of lullabies Watching the Nighttime Come. Slezak and David Wax, both members of Mexo-Americana band David Wax Museum, perform live in the studio—and share some challenges and triumphs of taking their baby on the road. And: In their […]

Telling American Stories
January 17th, 2015 - (0 Comments)

What are the biggest challenges facing American society today? And how can we solve them? Bro Adams, the new chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, says that science and technology can’t solve those challenges—but the humanities can. Plus: Most of us know the history of the battle at Gettysburg, but Jennifer Murray (UVA […]

Bringing Back the Chestnut
December 20th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Most of the chestnuts roasting on open fires this winter are from Europe or Asia, not America. In the early 1900s, American chestnut trees from Maine to Georgia were largely wiped out by blight. Heather Griscom (James Madison University) is helping to restore American chestnut trees and joins us for a sampling of holiday chestnut […]

Give War and Peace a Chance
December 13th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

January 2015 marks the 150th anniversary of the first publication of Tolstoy’s War and Peace. Andrew Kaufman’s (University of Virginia) book Give War and Peace a Chance: Tolstoyan Wisdom for Troubled Times says that Tolstoy’s masterpiece is more relevant to readers now than ever. Plus: Gone With the Wind, The Patriot, Born on the Fourth […]

Reading the Founding Fathers’ Mail
December 6th, 2014 - (1 Comments)

More than 30 people who spent the last three years immersed in thousands of letters written by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams and Abigail Adams, and James Madison, are experiencing a sense of loss and sorrow now that the massive project to proofread the letters and make them available online has come to a […]

Giving Thanks—or Miigwetch
November 22nd, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Gathered around the Thanksgiving table, Americans tell stories about colonists and Native Americans coming together. But do Native Americans even celebrate Thanksgiving? And what would Native American heritage food look like? This November, With Good Reason takes a look at the indigenous side of a Thanksgiving table. Anton Treuer, author of Everything You Wanted to […]

Plague After War
November 15th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Fears of an Ebola outbreak in the U.S. have mostly subsided, but in some parts of West Africa, the epidemic is growing faster than ever. Jim Hentz (Virginia Military Institute) studies the nature of war in Africa and says the spread of Ebola in countries like Sierra Leone and Liberia mirrors that of conflict in […]

Horror in the Hills
October 18th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

Emily Satterwhite (Virginia Tech) talks about two very different images of Appalachia: the pastoral, small towns of literature and the often violent cannibals of horror films. And: In the mid-90s, Latino immigrants started to migrate to smaller towns in the South. Barbara Ellen Smith (Virginia Tech) says the new Appalachia includes chicken enchiladas and tamales. Plus: […]

Furious Flower Honors Rita Dove
October 11th, 2014 - (0 Comments)

The most celebrated African American poets in America pay homage to the life’s work of former Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Prize winner Rita Dove (University of Virginia). The occasion was the inspiration of Joanne Gabbin, Director of the Furious Flower Poetry Center at James Madison University. With Good Reason interviews Rita Dove and features readings […]